Angebote zu "Trade" (8 Treffer)

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Impact of Trade Liberalization on National Food...
59,00 € *
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Agriculture is the backbone of Nepal having its one-third share in GDP and employs two-third population. Nepal is adopting most liberal trade policies among South Asian countries but facing decade long trade stress in lieu of that almost one-third population living in two-third of districts are food deficit. This study has been quantifying impacts of trade liberalization by using extended form of multi-market model for rice, wheat, maize and potato markets in 2010. Altogether ten policy scenarios under five broad categories are simulated and respective results are compared with base period. Impact indicators of food self-sufficiency, economic surplus, GDP growth, food trade balance, self-reliance, and government revenue are expected to be far better in partial policy reforms even world price increases,supply shock happens or global food demand increases but net-food consumption and net-welfare improvement are far better under moderate to full trade policy reforms. Study recommends tetra-track policies for reducing food insecurity trade stress in the WTO regime.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 07.08.2020
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Rationalization of Brand Portfolio- Strategic a...
98,90 € *
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Fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) are the 4th largest sector in the Indian economy. There are three main segments in the sector - food and beverages which accounts for 19 per cent of the sector, healthcare which accounts for 31 per cent and household and personal care which accounts for the remaining 50 per cent. The FMCG sector has grown from US$ 31.6 billion in 2011 to US$ 52.75 billion in 2017-18. The sector is further expected to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 27.86 per cent to reach US$ 103.7 billion by 2020. The sector witnessed growth of 16.5 per cent in value terms between June-September 2018, supported by moderate inflation, increase in private consumption and rural income. It is forecasted to grow at 12-13 per cent between September- December 2018.^ FMCG's urban segment is expected to have a steady revenue growth at 8 per cent in FY19 and the rural segment is forecasted to contribute 15-16 per cent of total income in FY19. Post GST and demonetisation, modern trade share grew to 10 per cent of the overall FMCG revenue, as of August 2018.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 07.08.2020
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Marketing Strategies Related to Regional Integr...
49,00 € *
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Challenges are forcing business firms to seek best management and marketing strategies so as to grow their market share and increase shareholder value. Companies in the Kenyan sugar industry must survive and satisfy their shareholders expectations in the industry in spite of low yields on the one hand and high costs of production and importation of low-cost sugar on the other.The market environment of the industry is complicated by regional integration by such bodies as Common Market for Eastern and Central Africa and East African Community.This research found out that in the year 2008 Mumias Sugar Company, the market leader with a share of 60 per cent, adopted diversification strategy to counter effects of Regional Trade Agreements which cause cheap sugar imports. The study revealed that the increase in market share, a rise in profit and revenue and a decrease in operational costs were highly related. In conclusion the study recommends that Kenyan sugar firms should lobby the Government to zero rate domestic sugar and they should diversify into other and value added as well as conduct research into production of fast-maturing cane.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 07.08.2020
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Trade policy of developing countries and emergi...
21,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Scientific Essay from the year 2012 in the subject Economics - International Economic Relations, , language: English, abstract: The current global economy is characterized by extensive globalization of the markets. The accompanying international trade affects industrial nations and developing countries in differing degrees. The analysis of trade policy in developing countries can, in the process, be analyzed using the same tools as those for developed countries, namely industrial na-tions. Earlier development stages of trade policy amongst developing countries were character-ized by protectionism and an orientation towards a domestic market which consequently led to a weak internationalization of these countries. It was not possible to decrease the distance between the classical industrial states since the industrial states themselves, in the context of the first phase of globalization, were able to significantly advance on a global scale.As a result of the rejection of protectionism by means of changing political structures and the accompanying liberalization, it was therefore possible, in the early phases of globaliza-tion, whose origins lie in the end of the 19th and the start of the 20th century, for several developing countries to successfully advance in the wake of the general dynamic of inter-nationalization. The share in the world good's market; the volumes in direct investments and the inflows of portfolio capital were able to increase amongst these groups of countries, albeit not for all countries to the same extent. As a result, the majority of developing countries today are tightly embedded in world trade. Moreover, these countries were capable of registering export quotas of 20% and 30%. The gap between the so-called OECD countries could be largely made up for. In the course of early globalization, the OECD countries also dynamically developed with the consequence that many developing countries were, in turn, able to benefit from these global economic interactions. Today, the export revenue of OECD countries with develop-ing countries represents 25%. This is a 40% increase within the last 20 years. The foreign trade of developing countries with OECD countries, on the other hand, ac-counts for merely 60% of the total foreign trade of developing countries in our present day. At the same time, there has been an emergence of foreign trade diversification in favor of exporting industrial goods by courtesy of developing countries which amounted to as much as 84% in 1996 which in 1996 accounted for as much as 84%.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 07.08.2020
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The Distributional Effect of Social Welfare Spe...
19,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Research Paper (undergraduate) from the year 2013 in the subject Economics - Case Scenarios, grade: A, , course: Fiscal and Monetary Policy Analysis and Management, language: English, abstract: This paper attempts to test the validity of public welfare spending theories (compensation theory, system theory, median voter theory, group theory, Incrementalism and some variants of public choice theory) in the context of Thailand. The study make use of GDP, previous welfare spending, increases in population, tax revenue, openness to trade, democratic government, labour union, trade association, urbanisation and welfare spending as a share of GDP over the period 1982 - 2007. We found strong and positive link between globalisation, GDP, tax revenue, labour union and previous welfare spending with Thailand welfare spending. These increases will invariably call for increased access to education, health care systems and other related welfare spending which means, the revenue base has to be increased through tax. We therefore recommend Thai Government to undertake reform in the tax system to broaden the tax net. Also, land and property tax systems ought to be reformed as well to extend coverage. We also recommend the stimulation of domestic demand in Thailand to reduce the over reliance on the international market which exposes countries to high end risks and uncertainties. The falling population growth in Thailand could also spell a doom to Thai's labour supply. Thailand currently relies on immigrant workers from neigbouring countries like Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Burma. As the economic conditions in these countries improve, these immigrant workers might return. This will create a shortage in the supply needs to cater for the ever increasing demand propelled by the continuous industralisation of the Thai economy. Policy decision makers should factor this in their subsequent decision to mitigate this effect in the near future.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 07.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Trade policy of developing countries and emergi...
12,40 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Scientific Essay from the year 2012 in the subject Economics - International Economic Relations, , language: English, abstract: The current global economy is characterized by extensive globalization of the markets. The accompanying international trade affects industrial nations and developing countries in differing degrees. The analysis of trade policy in developing countries can, in the process, be analyzed using the same tools as those for developed countries, namely industrial na-tions. Earlier development stages of trade policy amongst developing countries were character-ized by protectionism and an orientation towards a domestic market which consequently led to a weak internationalization of these countries. It was not possible to decrease the distance between the classical industrial states since the industrial states themselves, in the context of the first phase of globalization, were able to significantly advance on a global scale.As a result of the rejection of protectionism by means of changing political structures and the accompanying liberalization, it was therefore possible, in the early phases of globaliza-tion, whose origins lie in the end of the 19th and the start of the 20th century, for several developing countries to successfully advance in the wake of the general dynamic of inter-nationalization. The share in the world good's market; the volumes in direct investments and the inflows of portfolio capital were able to increase amongst these groups of countries, albeit not for all countries to the same extent. As a result, the majority of developing countries today are tightly embedded in world trade. Moreover, these countries were capable of registering export quotas of 20% and 30%. The gap between the so-called OECD countries could be largely made up for. In the course of early globalization, the OECD countries also dynamically developed with the consequence that many developing countries were, in turn, able to benefit from these global economic interactions. Today, the export revenue of OECD countries with develop-ing countries represents 25%. This is a 40% increase within the last 20 years. The foreign trade of developing countries with OECD countries, on the other hand, ac-counts for merely 60% of the total foreign trade of developing countries in our present day. At the same time, there has been an emergence of foreign trade diversification in favor of exporting industrial goods by courtesy of developing countries which amounted to as much as 84% in 1996 which in 1996 accounted for as much as 84%.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 07.08.2020
Zum Angebot
The Distributional Effect of Social Welfare Spe...
13,40 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Research Paper (undergraduate) from the year 2013 in the subject Economics - Case Scenarios, grade: A, , course: Fiscal and Monetary Policy Analysis and Management, language: English, abstract: This paper attempts to test the validity of public welfare spending theories (compensation theory, system theory, median voter theory, group theory, Incrementalism and some variants of public choice theory) in the context of Thailand. The study make use of GDP, previous welfare spending, increases in population, tax revenue, openness to trade, democratic government, labour union, trade association, urbanisation and welfare spending as a share of GDP over the period 1982 - 2007. We found strong and positive link between globalisation, GDP, tax revenue, labour union and previous welfare spending with Thailand welfare spending. These increases will invariably call for increased access to education, health care systems and other related welfare spending which means, the revenue base has to be increased through tax. We therefore recommend Thai Government to undertake reform in the tax system to broaden the tax net. Also, land and property tax systems ought to be reformed as well to extend coverage. We also recommend the stimulation of domestic demand in Thailand to reduce the over reliance on the international market which exposes countries to high end risks and uncertainties. The falling population growth in Thailand could also spell a doom to Thai's labour supply. Thailand currently relies on immigrant workers from neigbouring countries like Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Burma. As the economic conditions in these countries improve, these immigrant workers might return. This will create a shortage in the supply needs to cater for the ever increasing demand propelled by the continuous industralisation of the Thai economy. Policy decision makers should factor this in their subsequent decision to mitigate this effect in the near future.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 07.08.2020
Zum Angebot